Храм христа спасителя на английском языке

The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour (Russian: Храм Христа́ Спаси́теля, tr. Khram Khristá Spasítelya, IPA: [xram xrʲɪˈsta spɐˈsʲitʲɪlʲə]) is a Russian Orthodox cathedral in Moscow, Russia, on the northern bank of the Moskva River, a few hundred metres southwest of the Kremlin. With an overall height of 103 metres (338 ft),[4] it is the third tallest Orthodox Christian church building in the world, after the People’s Salvation Cathedral in Bucharest, Romania and Saints Peter and Paul Cathedral in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

Храм Христа Спасителя
Khram Khrista Spasitelya

The new Cathedral of Christ the Saviour as viewed from the bridge over the Moscow River

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour is located in Moscow

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

55°44′40″N 37°36′20″E / 55.74444°N 37.60556°E
Location Moscow, Russia
Denomination Russian Orthodox
Website www.xxc.ru
History
Consecrated 19 August 2000
Architecture
Style Russian Revival
Specifications
Capacity 9,500 people[1]
Length 79 m[1]
Width 79 m[1]
Height 103.4 m (top cross)[2]
91.5 m (top dome)[2]
69.5 m (dome ceiling)[2]
Nave height 37 m (interior)[1]
Other dimensions 194,900 m3 [2]
Floor area 3,980 m2[3]
Dome diameter (outer) 29.8 m[2]

The current church is the second to stand on this site. The authentic church, built during the 19th century, took more than 40 years to build, and was the scene of the 1882 world premiere of the 1812 Overture composed by Tchaikovsky. It was destroyed in 1931 on the order of the Soviet Politburo. The demolition was supposed to make way for a colossal Palace of the Soviets to house the country’s legislature, the Supreme Soviet of the USSR. Construction started in 1937 but was halted in 1941 when Germany invaded the Soviet Union during World War II. Its steel frame was disassembled the following year, and the palace was never built. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the current cathedral was restored on the site between 1995 and 2000.

Original cathedral


edit

Construction


edit

When Napoleon Bonaparte retreated from Moscow, Tsar Alexander I signed a manifesto on 25 December 1812 declaring his intention to build a cathedral in honor of Christ the Saviour «to signify Our gratitude to Divine Providence for saving Russia from the doom that overshadowed Her» and as a memorial to the sacrifices of the Russian people. It took some time for work on the projected cathedral to get started. The first finished architectural project, by Aleksandr Lavrentyevich Vitberg, was endorsed by the Tsar in 1817. It was a flamboyant Neoclassical design full of Masonic symbolism.

 

The building under construction in 1852 (as seen from the Kremlin)

Construction work was begun on the Sparrow Hills, the highest point in Moscow, but the site proved unstable. In the meantime Alexander I was succeeded by his brother Nicholas I. Profoundly Orthodox and patriotic, the new Tsar disliked the Neoclassicism and Freemasonry of the design selected by his predecessor. He commissioned his favorite architect Konstantin Thon to create a new design, taking as his model Hagia Sophia in the byzantine capital Constantinople (present day Istanbul, Turkey). Thon’s Russian Revival design was approved in 1832. A new site closer to the Moscow Kremlin was chosen by the Tsar in 1837. A convent and church on the site had to be relocated, so the cornerstone of the new church was not laid until 1839.

The cathedral took many years to build; the scaffolding was not taken down until 1860. Its painting was overseen by Evgraf Sorokin, and thereafter some of the best Russian painters (Ivan Kramskoi, Vasily Surikov, V. P. Vereshchagin) continued to embellish the interior for another twenty years. The giant dome of the cathedral was gilded using the new technique of gold electroplating, replacing the older and insecure technique of mercury gilding.[5] Although Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture was written with the building’s completion in mind, it had its world premiere in a tent outside the unfinished church in August 1882. The cathedral was consecrated on 26 May 1883, the day before Alexander III was crowned.[6]

The inner sanctum of the church (naos) was ringed by a two-floor gallery, its walls inlaid with rare sorts of marble, granite, and other stones. The ground floor of the gallery was a memorial dedicated to the Russian victory over Napoleon. The walls displayed more than 1,000 square metres (11,000 sq ft) of Carrara bianca marble plaques listing major commanders, regiments, and battles of the Patriotic War of 1812 (with the lists of awards and casualties appended). The second floor of the gallery was occupied by church choirs.

Demolition


edit

 

The cathedral in the early 20th century
 
Demolition, 5 December 1931

Following the 1917 Russian Revolution, the USSR’s official state atheism resulted in the 1921–1928 anti-religious campaign, during which many «church institution[s] at [the] local, diocesan or national level were systematically destroyed.»[7] Following the death of Vladimir Lenin in 1924, Soviet leader Joseph Stalin chose the prominent site of the cathedral as the proposed site for a monument to socialism known as the Palace of the Soviets. It was to have modernistic, buttressed tiers to support a gigantic statue of Lenin perched on top of a dome with his arm raised in the air.

The government plans for economic development in Russia during the 1930s required more funds than were available at the time. In searching for additional sources of revenue and funding, government agencies saw monetary value in religious and historical monuments that had not yet been destroyed or otherwise repurposed for government use. On 24 February 1930, the economic department of the OGPU sent a letter to the Chairman of the Central Executive Committee asking to remove the golden domes of the Christ the Saviour Cathedral. The letter noted that the dome of the church contained over 20 tons of gold of «excellent quality», and that the cathedral represented an «unnecessary luxury for the Soviet Union, and the withdrawal of the gold would make a great contribution to the industrialization of the country.» The People’s Commissariat of Finance did not object to this proposal.[8]

On 13 July 1931, a meeting of the Central Executive Committee of the Soviet Union was held under the chairmanship of Mikhail Kalinin. The meeting decided to build the palace on the territory of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour: “The place for the construction of the Palace of Soviets to choose the area of the Cathedral of Christ in the mountains. Moscow with the demolition of the church itself and the necessary expansion of the area.» This decision was prepared at a meeting of the Politburo of the All-Union Communist Party (b) on 5 June 1931.[9] 11 days later, the resolution of the Committee for Cult Affairs under the Presidium of the All-Russian Central Executive Committee was adopted:[10]

In view of the allotment of the site on which the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour is located, for the construction of the Palace of Soviets, the said temple should be liquidated and demolished. Instruct the Presidium of the Moscow Oblast Executive Committee to liquidate (close) the church within ten days … The petition of the OGPU economic department for gold washing and the petition for the construction of the Palace of Soviets for the transfer of building material to be submitted to the secretariat of the All-Russian Central Executive Committee.

For several months, urgent work was carried out to dismantle the temple building, the remains of which it was eventually decided would be blown up. On 5 December 1931, the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour was dynamited and reduced to rubble. It took more than a year to clear the debris from the site. The construction of the Palace of Soviets was ultimately halted due to a lack of funds, problems with flooding from the nearby Moskva River, and the outbreak of World War II. Some of the marble from the walls and benches of the cathedral was used in nearby Moscow Metro stations. The original marble high reliefs were preserved and are now on display at the Donskoy Monastery. For many decades, these reliefs were the only reminders of one of the largest Orthodox churches ever built. The flooded foundation hole remained on the site, but in 1958 under Nikita Khrushchev, it was transformed into the world’s largest open air swimming pool, named Moskva Pool.

The huge area of evaporation generated by the huge water surface of the pool was the cause of corrosion of neighboring buildings. In particular, employees of the Pushkin Museum complained that the location of the outdoor pool negatively affected the safety of the exhibits.[11]

Restored cathedral


edit

 
The rebuilt cathedral, view across the Moscow River
 
Night view next to the river

The construction of the pool on a site of the destroyed cultural heritage caused a negative reaction of the Moscow public. The history of the site’s Cathedral, the unbuilt Palace of the Soviets, and the Moskva Pool was commonly summarized with the ironic expression «First there was a church, then rubbish, and now shame» (Russian: Сперва был храм, потом — хлам, а теперь — срам., romanized: Sperva byl khram, potom – khlam, a teper’ – sram.).[citation needed]

In February 1990, the Russian Orthodox Church received permission from the Soviet government to restore the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour. A temporary cornerstone was laid by the end of the year. The architect Aleksey Denisov was called upon to design a replica, but was soon fired from the project because of disagreements with the mayor’s office.[12] When construction was well under way, he was replaced by Zurab Tsereteli.

A construction fund was initiated in 1992 and funds began to pour in from citizens in the autumn of 1994, and about one million Muscovites donated money for the project. In this year the Moskva Pool was dismantled and the cathedral reconstruction commenced. The lower church was consecrated to the Saviour’s Transfiguration in 1997, and the completed Cathedral of Christ the Saviour was consecrated on the Transfiguration Day, 19 August 2000.

 

The central dome of the cathedral

Below the new church is a large hall for church assemblies. The cathedral square is graced by several chapels, designed in the same style as the cathedral. A footbridge across the river from Bersenevskaya embankment was constructed between 21 June 2003 and 3 September 2004 (photo). On the slope of the hill to the right of the cathedral the monument to Alexander II is located.

Significant events


edit

In 2000, the cathedral was the venue for the canonization of the Romanovs when the last Tsar Nicholas II and his family, who were murdered by the Bolsheviks in 1918, were canonized as saints. On 17 May 2007, the Act of Canonical Communion between the Moscow Patriarchate of the Russian Orthodox Church and the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia was signed there. The ROCOR had been separate since the 1920s. The full restoration of communion with the Moscow Patriarchate was celebrated by a Divine Liturgy at which the Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia, Alexius II and the First Hierarch of ROCOR, Metropolitan Laurus, concelebrated the Divine Liturgy for the first time in history.

The first Russian president Boris Yeltsin, who died of heart failure on 23 April 2007, lay in state in the cathedral prior to his burial in Novodevichy Cemetery.

In 2009 the cathedral was visited by Metropolitan Jonah (Paffhausen), former primate of the Orthodox Church in America, who celebrated the Liturgy with Patriarch Kirill I. Metropolitan Jonah later described the event, saying that even with a congregation of approximately 2,500, the vast church was only half full. About 16 bishops attended the ordination of a new bishop that day.[13]

On February 21, 2012, Russian feminist punk rock group Pussy Riot staged a guerrilla performance in the cathedral in protest against Vladimir Putin, singing «Mother of God, please banish Putin!».[14] Five members of the band participated in the said performance.[15] Three members were identified, while the other two fled Russia. Those three members, Yekaterina Samutsevich, Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, were jailed for hooliganism.[16]

See also


edit

  • List of churches in Moscow
  • List of large Orthodox cathedrals
  • List of tallest domes
  • USSR anti-religious campaign (1928–1941)

References


edit

  1. ^ a b c d «Храм Христа Спасителя».
  2. ^ a b c d e «Основные размеры Храма Христа Спасителя».
  3. ^ Sidorov, Dmitri (2000). «National Monumentalization and the Politics of Scale: The Resurrections of the Cathedral of Christ the Savior in Moscow». Annals of the Association of American Geographers. 90 (3): 548–572. doi:10.1111/0004-5608.00208. ISSN 0004-5608. JSTOR 1515528. S2CID 144856387.
  4. ^ «ХРАМ ХРИСТА СПАСИТЕЛЯ». www.xxc.ru. Archived from the original on 2 December 2010. Retrieved 5 January 2018.
  5. ^ The history of galvanoplating in Russia Archived 5 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine (in Russian)
  6. ^ Manaev, G. (18 December 2019). «10 LOST architectural wonders of Moscow (PHOTOS)». Russia Beyond the Headlines. Retrieved 29 January 2020.
  7. ^ Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia. Taylor & Francis. 2002. p. 46. ISBN 1857431375.
  8. ^ Ратьковский И.С.; Ходяков М.В. (1999). учебник История России. pp. 137–149. Archived from the original on 25 December 2008. Retrieved 23 February 2023 – via Библиотека Гумер.
  9. ^ Anna, Semyonova (5 December 2016). The Temple That Joseph Destroyed.
  10. ^ Rogachev, A.V. Great Construction Projects of Socialism. Tsentrpoligraf.
  11. ^ Илья Варламов (4 September 2012). «Бассейн Москва». Varlamov.ru. Archived from the original on 12 March 2018. Retrieved 31 March 2018.
  12. ^ «Moscow’s Iconic Cathedral Was Restored Wrongfully on Cursed Location». 24 September 2009. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  13. ^ «Conversations with Metropolitan Jonah: Ministry, Monasticism, and the Episcopacy». 2 June 2009. Archived from the original on 2 November 2010. Retrieved 3 June 2009.
  14. ^ Rumens, Carol (20 August 2012). «Pussy Riot’s Punk Prayer is pure protest poetry». TheGuardian.com. Guardian News & Media. Retrieved 13 January 2019.
  15. ^ Pussy Riot gig at Christ the Saviour Cathedral (original video). 2 July 2012. Archived from the original on 24 August 2012. Retrieved 1 September 2012.
  16. ^ «Russian court imprisons Pussy Riot band members on hooliganism charges». CNN. 18 August 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2023.

External links


edit

  • Travel2moscow.com – Official Moscow Guide
  • Official website, with full details of the construction and reconstruction history.
  • Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow by Evgenia Kirichenko
  • Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow: A Russian Allegory
  • Churches Around the World Archive
  • 360° Virtual Tour of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

Перевод «храм христа спасителя» на английский

Перевод

Ваш текст переведен частично.
Вы можете переводить не более 999 символов за один раз.

Войдите или зарегистрируйтесь бесплатно на PROMT.One и переводите еще больше!

<>


храм христа спасителя

м.р.
существительное

Склонение

мн.
храмы христа спасителя


Храм Христа Спасителя

м.р.
существительное

Склонение

Christ the Savior Cathedral


Российская феминистская панк-группа Pussy Riot неожиданно явилась в Храм Христа Спасителя в Москве в платьях-мини и масках.

At Moscow’s Christ the Savior Cathedral Tuesday, the Russian feminist punk band “Pussy Riot” made a surprise visit, dressed in mini-dresses and masks.

Больше

Контексты с «храм христа спасителя»

Российская феминистская панк-группа Pussy Riot неожиданно явилась в Храм Христа Спасителя в Москве в платьях-мини и масках.
At Moscow’s Christ the Savior Cathedral Tuesday, the Russian feminist punk band “Pussy Riot” made a surprise visit, dressed in mini-dresses and masks.

В воскресенье один из активистов оппозиции был задержан, а позже избит, после того как он попытался войти в московский Храм Христа Спасителя, чтобы провести молебен за избавление России от власти Владимира Путина.
An opposition activist was detained and beaten Sunday after he tried to enter Moscow’s landmark Christ the Savior Cathedral to pray to deliver Russia from Vladimir Putin.

Фарид Асадуллин, заведующий Отделом науки и связей Московского муфтията, заявил, что места религиозного поклонения сносят постоянно, заметив, что возведенный в Москве в 1883 году православный Храм Христа Спасителя был разрушен в 1931 году (при Сталине, который распорядился построить там бассейн) и вновь отстроен в 1990-е.
Farid Asadullin, chairman of the scientific and public department of the Council of Muftis, said houses of worship are destroyed all the time, pointing out that Moscow’s 1883 Orthodox Christ the Savior Cathedral was torn down in 1931 (by Stalin, who replaced it with a swimming pool) and then built anew in the 1990s.

Один из свидетелей заявил, что девушки нарушили дресс-код Храма Христа Спасителя своими короткими платьями. Женщины обязаны вести себя в церкви смиренно.
One witness said that the young women violated the Cathedral of Christ the Savior dress code with their short dresses and that women were expected to behave modestly in church.

В некоторых популярных среди туристов храмах на видном месте стоят иконы с изображением членов царской семьи — в том числе, в московском Храме Христа Спасителя и в санкт-петербургском Казанском соборе.
Devotional images — icons — of the family are prominently displayed in some of Russia’s most tourist-visited churches, including Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Saviour and St. Petersburg’s Kazan Cathedral.

Больше

Примеры употребления слов в разных контекстах предоставляются исключительно в лингвистических целях, т. е. для изучения употребления слов в одном языке и вариантов их перевода на другой. Все образцы собраны автоматически из открытых источников с помощью технологии поиска на основе двуязычных данных. Если вы обнаружили орфографическую, пунктуационную или иную ошибку в оригинале или переводе, используйте опцию «Сообщить о проблеме» или напишите нам

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
Хра́м Христа́ Спаси́теля

Russia-Moscow-Cathedral of Christ the Saviour-8.jpg

Modern replica of the original Cathedral

Basic information
Location Moscow, Russia
Geographic coordinates Coordinates: 55°44′40″N 37°36′20″E / 55.74444, 37.60556
Religious affiliation Eastern Orthodox Church
Website The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
Architectural description
Architect/s Konstantin Thon
Architectural type Neo-Byzantine
Specifications
Capacity 10,000
Dome height (outer) 103 meters (340 ft)

The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour (Russian: Хра́м Христа́ Спаси́теля) is the tallest Eastern Orthodox Church in the world. It is situated in Moscow, on the banks of the Moskva River, a few blocks west of the Kremlin.

The cathedral was commissioned by Tsar Alexander I on December 25, 1812, following the defeat and withdrawal of Napoleon’s troops from Russia. The Tsar proclaimed the cathedral a monument of gratitude for the intervention of «Divine Providence for saving Russia» from doom, and as a memorial to the sacrifices of the Russian people.

Following the death of Vladimir Lenin in 1924, the site of the cathedral was chosen by the Soviets as the site for a monument to socialism known as the Palace of Soviets. The palace was to have been topped by a 100 meters (330 ft) statue of Lenin. The Cathedral was demolished in December 1931 to make way for the monument. Construction of the palace began in 1937, but was terminated by the German invasion in 1941 and was never completed.

With the end of Soviet rule, the Russian Orthodox Church received state permission to rebuild the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour. A temporary cornerstone was laid in 1990, and the completed Cathedral of Christ the Saviour was consecrated on the Day of Transfiguration, August 19, 2000.

The glory of Russian culture is exemplified not only in its arts, sciences and literature, but also in the splendor of its churches. Many in Russia view the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour as an allegory of the life of Christ as well as of Russia itself. After enduring the 20th century’s history of Nazi-fascism from without and of Marxist-Communism from within, at the beginning of the twenty-first century it stands ready for a new era. The resurrected Cathedral is a symbol of hope and encouragement to the Russian people.

History

The birth of the Cathedral of Christ the Savior was the result of the Napoleonic Wars of the early nineteenth century. Envisioning Europe as a confederation of states under French hegemony, Napoleon headed to Russia in 1812. Known as the Great Patriotic War of 1812, Napoleon’s engagement with Russia lasted less than one year, and resulted in the defeat and destruction of what had been believed to be an undefeatable force.
Less than 10 percent of the invading army survived.

When the last of Napoleon’s soldiers left Moscow, Tsar Alexander I signed a manifesto, December 25, 1812, declaring his intention to build a Cathedral in honor of Christ the Saviour «to signify Our gratitude to Divine Providence for saving Russia from the doom that overshadowed Her» and as a memorial to the sacrifices of the Russian people.

It took some time for actual work on the cathedral project to get started. The first finished architectural project was endorsed by Alexander I in 1817. It was a flamboyant Neoclassical design full of Freemasonic symbolism. Construction work was begun on the Sparrow Hills, the highest point in Moscow, but the site proved insecure.

Alexander I developed typhus, from which he died in Russia’s southern city of Taganrog on December 1, 1825. He was succeeded by his brother Nicholas. Profoundly Orthodox and patriotic, the new Tsar disliked the Neoclassicism and Freemasonry of the project selected by his brother. He commissioned his favorite architect, Konstantin Thon, to create a new design, taking as his model Hagia Sophia in Constantinople. Thon’s Neo-Byzantine design was approved in 1832, and a new site, closer to the Moscow Kremlin, was chosen by the Tsar in 1837. A convent and church on the site had to be relocated, so that the cornerstone was not laid until 1839.

Construction

View of the cathedral and the Great Stone Bridge in 1905.

The Cathedral took twenty-one years to build and did not emerge from its scaffolding until 1860. Some of the best Russian painters (Ivan Kramskoi, Vasily Surikov, Vasily Vereshchagin) continued to embellish the interior for another twenty years. The Cathedral was consecrated on the very day Alexander III was crowned, May 26, 1883. A year earlier, Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture debuted there.

The inner sanctum of the church was ringed by a two-floor gallery, its walls inlaid with rare sorts of marble, granite, and other precious stones. The ground floor of the gallery was a memorial dedicated to the Russian victory over Napoleon. The walls displayed more than 1,000 square meters of Carrara bianca marble plaques listing major commanders, regiments, and battles of the Patriotic War of 1812 with the lists of awards and casualties appended. The second floor of the gallery was occupied by church choirs.

Demolition

After the Russian Revolution of 1917 and, more specifically, the death of Vladimir Lenin, the prominent site of the cathedral was chosen by the Soviets as the site for a monument to socialism known as the Palace of Soviets. This monument was to rise in modernistic, buttressed tiers to support a gigantic statue of Lenin perched atop a dome with his arm raised in blessing.

On December 5, 1931, by order of Stalin’s minister Lazar Kaganovich, after removing much of the interior decorations and art works, the temple was dynamited and reduced to rubble. It took more than one blast to destroy the church and more than a year to clear the debris from the site. The original marble high reliefs were preserved and are now on display at the Donskoy Monastery. For over six decades, they were the only reminder of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour.

The construction of the Palace of Soviets was interrupted due to a lack of funds, problems with flooding from the nearby Moskva River, and the outbreak of war. The flooded foundation hole remained on the site for nearly thirty years. Under Nikita Khrushchev’s leadership in 1958-1960, the Palace foundations were cleared of rubble and converted to the open-air Moskva swimming pool. The one-of-a-kind circular pool had a diameter of 129 meters (423.23 ft).

New cathedral

With the end of the Soviet rule, the Russian Orthodox Church received permission to rebuild the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in February 1990. A temporary cornerstone was laid by the end of the year. The restorer Aleksey Denisov was called upon to design a replica of extraordinary accuracy.

A construction fund was initiated in 1992 and funds began to pour in from ordinary citizens in the autumn of 1994. When construction was well under way, Denisov was replaced by Zurab Tsereteli who introduced several controversial innovations. For instance, the original marble high reliefs along the walls gave way to the modern bronze ones, which have few if any parallels in Russian church architecture. The lower church was consecrated to the Saviour’s Transfiguration in 1996, and the completed Cathedral of Christ the Saviour was consecrated on the Transfiguration day, August 19, 2000.

A pedestrian bridge across the river from Balchug was constructed between June 21, 2003 and September 3, 2004. On the slope of the hill to the right from the cathedral are the monumental statues of Alexander II and Nicholas II. The cathedral square is graced by several chapels, designed in the same style as the cathedral itself.

Below the new church is a large hall for church assemblies, where the last Russian Tsar and his family were canonized in 2000. On May 17, 2007, the Act of Canonical Communion between the Moscow Patriarchate of the Russian Orthodox Church and the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia was signed there. The full restoration of communion with the Moscow Patriarchate was celebrated by a Divine Liturgy at which the Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia, Alexius II, and the First Hierarch of ROCOR, Metropolitan Laurus, concelebrated the Divine Liturgy for the first time in history.

The first Russian President Boris Yeltsin, who died of heart failure on April 23, 2007, lay in state in the cathedral prior to his funeral and interment in Novodevichy Cemetery.

Remnant of the original Cathedral, preserved at Donskoy Monastery, Moscow.

Interior of the Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow (1883).

The cathedral, showing the pedestrian bridge stretched out before it.

References

ISBN links support NWE through referral fees

  • Byzantines.net. Cathedral of Christ the Savior in Moscow: A Russian Allegory. Retrieved January 16, 2009.
  • De Préneuf, Flore Martinant. 1997. The Historical and Political Significance of the Reconstruction of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow. Thesis (M. Phil.)—University of Oxford, 1997. OCLC 50455326
  • Gentes, A. 1998. «The Life, Death and Resurrection of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour, Moscow.» History Workshop Journal. (46): 63-96. OCLC 206503953.
  • The Russian Orthodox Church. Cathedral of Christ the Saviour. Retrieved January 16, 2009.

Credits

New World Encyclopedia writers and editors rewrote and completed the Wikipedia article
in accordance with New World Encyclopedia standards. This article abides by terms of the Creative Commons CC-by-sa 3.0 License (CC-by-sa), which may be used and disseminated with proper attribution. Credit is due under the terms of this license that can reference both the New World Encyclopedia contributors and the selfless volunteer contributors of the Wikimedia Foundation. To cite this article click here for a list of acceptable citing formats.The history of earlier contributions by wikipedians is accessible to researchers here:

  • Cathedral_of_Christ_the_Saviour_(Moscow)  history

The history of this article since it was imported to New World Encyclopedia:

  • History of «Cathedral of Christ the Saviour (Moscow)»

Note: Some restrictions may apply to use of individual images which are separately licensed.


На основании Вашего запроса эти примеры могут содержать грубую лексику.


На основании Вашего запроса эти примеры могут содержать разговорную лексику.

Перевод «храм Христа Спасителя» на английский

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

Christ the Saviour Cathedral

Christ the Savior Cathedral

temple of Christ the Savior

Cathedral of the Saviour

Temple of Christ the Saviour

the Cathedral of Christ the Savior

the church of Christ the Savior


Таким образом, храм Христа Спасителя — это двойной символ: победы и покаяния в гонениях на верующих.



In addition, the Cathedral is a double symbol: of victory and remorse over the persecution of believers.


Есть некоторые, которые говорят, что Сталин приказал разрушить храм Христа Спасителя главным образом из-за того, что боялся, что с церковной колокольни пуля снайпера могла достать его в Кремле.



It is said that Stalin ordered the destruction of the Church of our Savior as a priority for fear that a sniper might reach him in the Kremlin from the bell tower of the church.


Он был перенесен с Волхонки из-за того, что на его месте решили строить храм Христа Спасителя.



It was demolished on Stalin’s order as he wished to build the Palace of Soviets instead.


Осмотр достопримечательностей Иркутска: площадь Кирова, храм Христа Спасителя и «Серый дом», посещение Центрального рынка в сердце старой торговой части Иркутска, совместный ужин и ночевка в гостинице в Иркутстке



Sightseeing in Irkutsk, including Kirov Square, the Church of our Saviour and the Gray House, visit to the central market in the heart of the old trading city of Irkutsk, dinner together and overnight in hotel in Irkutsk


Уничтожив Храм Христа Спасителя, лидеры новой Москвы в 1935 году начали строительство замены.



Having destroyed the Holy Savior, the leaders of the new Moscow started on building its replacement in 1935.


Храм Христа Спасителя стоит на этом месте и по сей день.


На Площади Победы находится Мэрия Калининграда, Храм Христа Спасителя и несколько красивых зданий, построенные в советский период.



In the Victory Square the City Hall of Kaliningrad is located, as well as the Temple of the Chr-ist the Savior and several beautiful buildings constructed in the Soviet time.


Смотри также: Ночные виды, Ольга, Храм Христа Спасителя, Церкви


Ябыл потрясен, когда уже позже увидел, что смогли восстановить Храм Христа Спасителя, совсеми его фресками иубранством.



Iwasdeeply impressed. Anditcame asashock when during mylater visit IsawtheCathedral ofChrist theSaviour completely restored, with allitsfrescoes andembellishments.


Смотри также: Главные достопримечательности, Ночные виды, Ольга, Столицы мира, Храм Христа Спасителя, Церкви, Религиозные здания



See also: Capitals of the world, Cathedral of the Saviour, Churches, Landmarks around the world, Night views, Olga, Religious buildings


Смотри также: Ольга, Россия — Москва, Храм Христа Спасителя, Церкви



See also: Capitals of the world, Cathedral of the Saviour, Churches, Landmarks around the world, Olga, Religious buildings, Russia — Moscow


Москва. Храм Христа Спасителя


В рекордно сжатые сроки храм Христа Спасителя был восстановлен почти впервозданном виде.


В1837 году Алексеевский монастырь перевели вКрасное село, анаего месте вЧертолье возвели храм Христа Спасителя. Впрочем, местность эта уже называлась иначе- Пречистенкой: 16апреля 1658 года царь Алексей Михайлович Романов издал указ оеепереименовании вчесть иконы Пречистой Божией Матери, что находилась вНоводевичьем монастыре.



Though the locality was called differently already- the new name was Prechistenka: onApril16, 1658, tsar Mikhail Alekseevich signed the decree onthe renaming ofthe locality inhonor ofthe icon ofthe Most Blessed Mother that was stored inNovodevichy Convent.


Итак, давайте разберемся: а что представляет собой Храм Христа Спасителя? Если бы современный ХХС был бы воссоздан по проекту Витберга, то храм был бы больше в три раза!



If modern HHS would be recreated under the project of Vitberg, the temple would be three times larger!


Памятник Фридриху Энгельсу печально взирает на реконструированный Храм Христа Спасителя. Одновременно это место имеет особое значение, поскольку на его ступенях 19 января 2009 года были убиты адвокат Станислав Маркелов и журналистка Анастасия Бабурова, и об этом создан импровизированный мемориал.



On its steps, there is an improvised memorial for human right lawyer Stanislav Markelov and journalist Anastasia Baburova who were assassinated by neo-Nazis here on January 19th 2009.


Рядом располагаются сохранившиеся постройки Мамоновой дачи- старинной усадьбы, принадлежавшей сначала князьям Долгоруким, затем роду Юсуповых, ас1833г.- графуМ.А. Дмитриеву-Мамонову. Навысоком берегу Воробьевых гор согласно первоначальному проекту должен был возвышаться Храм Христа Спасителя.



There are remaining constructions oftheMamonova dacha- an ancient mansion house atfirst owned byDolgorukis princes and then bytheYusupovs family and since 1827by EarlM.A. Dmitriev-Mamonov.

Ничего не найдено для этого значения.

Результатов: 18. Точных совпадений: 18. Затраченное время: 43 мс

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour – Xрам Христа Спасителя

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour – Xрам Христа Спасителя

As this is my first real post on the blog, I decided to talk about the first cultural site that really thrilled me: the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour. Actually, the very first thing which had arouse in me enthusiasm was the Red Square but everybody knows or has, at least, heard something about it. While, the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour is quite less famous in the world.

It is situated on the northern bank of the Moskva river and the nearest metro station is Kropotkinskaya. But thanks to its very central position you can also reach it on foot, because it’s just few minutes walk from the Kremlin. Furthermore, you cannot get lost because it is the tallest Orthodox Christian church in the world (103 metres) and you will be guided by its gold onions: cupolas typical for Russian architecture.
But the cathedral is not so old as you can imagine. Indeed, it is the result of a brand new project, realized in the Nineties. I’ll briefly tell you its troubled history. The original project is due to the Tzar Aleksandr I, who decided to commission it after the defeat of Napoleon in the 19th century, in honour of Christ the Saviour: “to signify Our gratitude to Divine Providence for saving Russia from the doom that overshadowed Her”. But the brother of Aleksandr I, Nikolaj I, when succeeded to him, changed completely the project with a new design, taking as inspiration the Hagia Sophia Church in Istanbul.
The cathedral was consecrated in 1883 but it didn’t survive for long time. Indeed, in 1931, Stalin decided to demolish it in order to build the Palace of the Soviets (never created). Under the government of Nikita Khrushchev it was transformed into a huge public swimming pool. Only in February 1990, the Russian Orthodox Church received the permission from the Soviet Government to rebuild the Cathedral and the reconstruction finished in 2000.
If from the outside it seems magnificent and sumptuous, the inside is really breathtaking. The predominant colours are gold and red and all the walls and domes are painted with frescas  and religious images. There are always many people praying inside and this is a great way also to understand the Russian culture.
I really suggest everybody who is in Moscow or wants to visit this city, to go to have a look to this magnificent.
You will not regret!

До скорого!

Elena

This blog was brought to you by Elena, an intern and a student at Liden and Denz

Posted by Elena Bianchini

Hi everyone! My name is Elena and I’m a young italian student actually based in Moscow. I just got my graduation in languages and economics. I can speak English, Russian and Spanish. I’m really interested into traveling and exploring new places. So I decided to spend four months in Russia, studying at the Liden & Denz Centre of Moscow, in order to improve my russian and reach a good level of speaking. In future I would like to work in the commercial sector connected with the russian market. Furthermore, I love every aspect of the russian culture and I would like to analyze it deeper. I’m really interested into the history and the traditions of this country. I’m here in Moscow just from one month and I’m already in love with this city!

Related posts

Today marks the six month anniversary of my initial move to Russia in February, and my flight back to the UK. To find a way to say goodbye to …

Read more

It is well known that St. Petersburg is often referred to as the cultural capital of Russia, and during my short stay here I have certainly …

Read more

Top 5 Iconic Russian comedies
Cinema is one of Russia’s finest arts. Here we present a countdown of Russian Soviet comedies. They have become …

Read more

Всем привет! My name is Sonja, and I am a Swiss student and the new intern at Liden & Denz Saint-Petersburg. By coming to St. Petersburg I …

Read more

Понравилась статья? Поделить с друзьями:
  • Французский полугусеничный тягач unic p107
  • Булка для французского хот дога купить в волгограде
  • Гугл переводчик с английского на русский по фото с телефона
  • Spielzeuge перевод с немецкого
  • Марат фото французский революционер